Archive Monthly Archives: November 2016

Possibilities and the Opportunities

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Good morning,

How do you look at a situation? Do you see only what is there or do you see what could be? Step back and realize the possibilities and the opportunities you have. How can I look at something differently than I usually do?

“We have enough people who tell it like it is- now we could use a few who tell it like it can be.”
-Robert Orben

Have a great day!

Shai

Soy Protein – Your Essential Guide to Soy and Tofu

 

Soy protein is one of the highest quality
plant proteins.

Are you a fan of soy protein? With so many variations, soy can be a delicious extra in many recipes or even the main focus for a nutrient-packed healthy meal. Today, I’m writing about soy and sharing one of my favorite tofu recipes, because soybeans and soy foods provide high quality protein but are often overlooked in the grocery store.

What is soy?

Soybeans—actually, beans in general—are not much of a dietary staple in the western world. But traditional soy foods—like tofu, miso and tempeh—have formed the basis of the diet in East Asia for centuries, where they’re valued not only for their versatility, but also for the healthy nutrition they offer.

Soy is nutrient-packed

While all beans provide protein, soybeans top the list when it comes to protein quality. Proteins are made up of small building blocks called amino acids. Some amino acids are termed essential, which means that we have to get them from foods because our bodies can’t make them. A protein that contains all the essential amino acids is termed ‘complete’—and soy is one of the few complete proteins in the plant world.

Soybeans are also low in saturated fat and, like all plant foods, are naturally cholesterol-free. Soybeans also offer up calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and B-vitamins, along with omega-3 fats.

If you’re trying to work more plant protein into your diet, you might want to give soy a try. With so many soy products to choose from, it’s easier than ever. Here are some of the most popular forms of soy.

Soy options

  • Edamame are fresh green soybeans. You can often find these in your grocer’s freezer, either in the pod or already shelled. After briefly cooking in salted water, they can be eaten as a snack or added to soups and salads.
  • Tempeh is made from soybeans that are partially cooked, allowed to ferment and then formed into a firm block. Since tempeh is fermented, it’s a source of “good bacteria,” or probiotics. Tempeh has a meaty flavor and firm texture that holds its shape, so it’s great for salads and stir-fry dishes.
  • Miso is a paste made from fermented soybeans, which means it also contains probiotics. It’s used as base for soup as well as an ingredient in sauces, salad dressings and marinades. There are different varieties, and the color can range from light yellow to very deep brown. In general, light miso is less salty and milder in flavor than dark miso.
  • Soy milk is made from dried soybeans which are soaked in water until they’re rehydrated, then ground with water. The resulting milk is sold as a beverage or made into yogurt. Soy milk and soy yogurt each have about 7 grams of protein per 8 ounce (250 ml) serving. You can use soy milk as a beverage on its own, or you can substitute it for regular milk in most recipes or in protein shakes.
  • Soy nuts are roasted whole soybeans. They make a nice snack on their own, and they’re also good in salads, in trail mix and on cereal. Soy nuts (and soy nut butter, which is made from ground soy nuts) have a bit more protein and a bit less fat than peanuts (or peanut butter).
  • Soy protein powders and meat substitutes are made from soybean flour that’s had most of the fat removed. The powders can be added to shakes or stirred into oatmeal, and the soy meat substitutes can be used in all sorts of recipes in place of meat or poultry.
  • Tofu is essentially a cheese that’s made from soy milk. It ranges in texture from extra firm to extra soft and has a very mild flavor – which means it mixes well with anything from spicy sauces to naturally sweet fruits. The firmer type of tofu is good for grilling or stir-frying, while the softer, creamier style is good in shakes or sweetened and topped with fruit as a dessert.

Your quick guide to tofu

There are so many types of tofu that it can seem confusing. And I’m afraid many westerners dismiss tofu but it can taste great, and with so many benefits it’s worth finding a few favorite types of tofu.

Silken Tofu has the most moisture of all types of tofu. It has a soft, very smooth, custard-like texture and tends to fall apart easily. It also comes in different degrees of firmness, so don’t assume that all silken tofu is soft. Silken tofu is the best tofu for whipping up in the blender or food processor. Once it’s blended, silken tofu adds a smooth texture and nice protein boost to shakes, soups and sauce. Silken tofu can be turned into a healthy dessert when it’s blended with fruit, a dab of honey and a dash of cinnamon. Or you can blend it with garlic and herbs and use as a tasty dip for raw veggies.

Soft or Medium Tofu holds its shape a bit better than silken tofu, and it’s often mashed with a fork into a soft crumbly texture that makes a nice meat substitute in foods like pasta sauce. It’s also often used to make an ‘eggless’ egg salad by mashing with a bit of mustard and low-fat mayonnaise or with some avocado.

Firm or Extra Firm Tofu has the meatiest texture of any tofu, which means it holds up to stir-frying, roasting or grilling. To make it even chewier and more ‘meat-like,’ some people slice it up and freeze it (which will change the color, but not affect the taste) before using in recipes.

The best roasted tofu recipe

Still not sure about soy and tofu? Try my recipe for roasted tofu. It’s great right out of the oven, with some stir-fried veggies, and it’s good cold, too. I like to put my roasted tofu spears on top of a salad for lunch, or have a few pieces with some cucumber slices for a quick snack.

Ingredients

– 1 package firm tofu (typically, 14 oz, 425 g)

For the marinade
– 3 tbsp light soy sauce
– 3 tbsp rice vinegar
– 1 tsp sugar or honey
– 1 tsp sesame oil
– dash ground ginger
– dash garlic powder
– dash white pepper
– Olive oil (to lightly grease the baking sheet)

Method

– Whisk together the ingredients for the marinade in a shallow baking pan and set aside.
– Remove the tofu from the package and drain off all the water.
– Wrap the tofu block in a few paper towels or a regular clean kitchen towel, and gently press out any additional moisture.
– Cut the tofu into triangles, or ‘spears,’ and arrange in a single layer in the pan with the marinade, turning the pieces over to coat all sides.
– Cover with plastic wrap, and let marinate in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes. (I love this recipe because you can leave the tofu to marinate for up to 48 hours.)

When you are ready to cook the tofu:
– Preheat the oven to 350 F / 180 C / Gas Mark 4
– Coat a large baking sheet with a bit of olive oil to prevent the tofu from sticking. (You can cover with pan spray instead, or line your baking sheet with parchment paper.)
– Arrange the tofu pieces in a single layer on the baking sheet and pour any remaining marinade over the tofu pieces.
– Roast in the oven for about 45 minutes, turning occasionally (and gently).
– The pieces should be firm and have a nice brown glaze.
– If you aren’t going to eat these delicious tofu spears right away, you can store in the refrigerator. This roasted tofu is delicious hot or cold!

Written by Susan Bowerman. Susan is Director of Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training at Herbalife. Susan is a Registered Dietitian and a board-certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics.

 

Honesty

Good morning. Would people say that you are honest? People listen to your words and look at how you live in order to evaluate your character. Don’t be content with not telling a lie, live the truth.
” Honesty is more than not lying. It is truth telling, truth speaking, truth living, and truth loving.”

-James E. Faust

Have a great day!

Shai

compliment

Good morning 🌞,Sometimes we make life so much harder than what it truly is. Simple is good. 

Saying something nice to someone is a simple way to build someone up. You can change the face of someone’s day just by giving them a compliment 😊. Look for nice things to say about people; it changes the way you see 👀 them. 
“Everybody likes a compliment.”

-Abraham Lincoln 

Have a great day!

Shai

Good or Great

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Good or Great? How would people describe your work? Do the best you can as many times as it takes. You may have to look at it from a different perspective and make adjustments. What can I do differently to go from good to great?

Have a great day!

Leadership to be positive

It is easy to complain about a situation that you don’t like. It takes character and leadership to be positive and to be a part of the solution. How do your words resonate in the ears 👂 of the people around you?
“Say and do something positive that will help the situation; it doesn’t take any brains to complain.”

-Robert A. Cook

Have a great day!

Shai

Goals

If you want to grow, you have to challenge yourself beyond your comfort level. Set high goals, form sensible action plans and then work hard to reach your goals. How can you step out and set a higher goal than you are comfortable with and then reach it?

“The greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim 🎯 too high and falling short; but in setting our aim too low, and achieving our mark.”

-Michelangelo

Have a great day!

Shai 

25 Healthy Snacks for 150 Calories or Less

 

Snack smart! Here are 25 great snack ideas with 150 calories or less.

Snack smart! Here are 25 great snack ideas with 150 calories or less.

If you’re running out of healthy snack ideas, today’s post is for you. Ideally, a healthy snack should consist of some ‘beneficial’ carbohydrates and a bit of protein. The protein helps to satisfy your hunger, and the healthy carb sources (like fruits, vegetables and whole grains) have water and fiber in them, so they help to fill you up.

We all get into ruts with our eating—and snacking is no exception. If you’re turning to the same old snacks every day, here are some healthy snacks to try—all for 150 calories or less.

Protein Snack Bar

      – There are plenty of snack bars to choose from with 150 calories or less. For the most staying power, look for one that has some protein—10 grams or so per serving is a good target.

Mini Smoothie – Whip out your blender and make a snack-sized smoothie with ½ cup (125 ml) low-fat milk, ½ cup (75 g) of frozen berries and a scoop (12 g) of vanilla protein powder. About 140 calories, 8 grams of protein.

Greek-style Vanilla Yogurt and Fruit – One single-serve (5.3 oz/150 g) carton of yogurt + ½ cup (75 g) sliced strawberries. Sprinkle with nutmeg or cinnamon. About 145 calories, 13 grams of protein.

Low-fat Cottage Cheese + Chopped Veggies – ¾ cup (160 g) low-fat cottage cheese + ½ cup (60 g) chopped mixed veggies (carrots, cucumber, peppers). Add a few twists of fresh ground pepper. About 130 calories, 21 grams of protein.

Vegetables and Hummus Dip – 1/3 cup (80 g) hummus + cucumber, carrot, celery sticks. About 150 calories, 6 grams of protein.

Nonfat Latte – Made with 12 ounces (360 ml) low-fat milk or soy milk. Sprinkle with cinnamon. About 150 calories, 6-12 grams of protein.

Hard-boiled Egg on Tomato Slices – Slice a medium fresh tomato and one hard-boiled egg. Top tomato slices with egg slices, season with salt and pepper. About 120 calories, 6 grams of protein.

Edamame Soybeans – Drop 1 cup (150 g) frozen edamame soybeans (in the pod) into boiling water for a few minutes. Sprinkle with a little salt or soy sauce. About 150 calories, 12 grams of protein.

Tuna + Avocado – Pop open a single-serve can or pouch (2.5 oz/75 g) of tuna and mix with ¼ medium avocado, mashed. About 150 calories, 18 grams of protein.

Turkey Sticks – 3 ounces (90 g) roasted turkey breast wrapped around ½ medium cucumber cut into sticks. About 120 calories, 25 grams of protein.

Tortilla + Beans – Heat up two corn tortillas, top with 1/3 cup (50 g) cooked black beans and tomato salsa. About 140 calories, 7 grams of protein.

Vegetable Soup + Low-fat Cheese – Heat up one cup (250 mL) of low sodium vegetable soup and top with 1 ounce (30 g) grated nonfat mozzarella cheese. About 150 calories, 14 grams of protein.

Rice Cake + Nut Butter – Spread one rice cake with 1 tbsp of almond butter. About 135 calories, 5 grams of protein.

Shrimp + Cocktail Sauce – 3 ounces (85 g) cooked whole shrimp dipped in 3 tbsp of salsa or cocktail sauce. About 150 calories, 20 grams of protein.

Quick Spinach and Egg Cup – Put ½ cup (75 g) frozen chopped spinach in microwaveable coffee mug. Microwave on high 30 seconds. Pour 1 beaten egg, seasoned with salt and pepper, on top and microwave another 90 seconds, stirring after 45 seconds. About 100 calories, 6 grams of protein.

Quick Quinoa Salad – Mix together ½ cup (90 g) cold leftover cooked quinoa, with ¼ cup (30 g) minced veggies/parsley + 1 oz (30 g) fat-free feta cheese. Drizzle with lemon juice, season with salt & pepper. About 150 calories, 16 grams of protein.

Sweet Potato with Yogurt – Top ½ medium baked sweet potato with ½ cup (100 g) of plain nonfat Greek-style yogurt. Sprinkle with nutmeg. About 115 calories, 10 grams of protein.

Quick Bean Salad – Mix ½ cup (80 g) cooked white beans + 1 small chopped tomato + 1 tbsp of low-fat Italian salad dressing. About 150 grams, 8 grams of protein.

Tempeh Wraps – Slice 2 ounces (60 g) tempeh into long sticks. Wrap with thinly sliced cucumber. About 120 calories, 11 grams of protein.

• Roasted Garbanzo Beans – Drain a 1-pound (454 g) can of garbanzo beans. Toss with 2 tsp olive oil, salt & pepper. Roast on cookie sheet at 400 degrees, 30 minutes or until crunchy. Let cool. 1/3 recipe = about 150 calories, 12 grams of protein.

Turkey Jerky + Fruit – 1/8 medium-sized cantaloupe melon + 1 ounce (30 g) low sodium turkey jerky. About 100 calories, 14 grams of protein.

Soy Nuts + Fruit – 1/3 cup (30 g) dry roasted soy nuts + 1 small peach. About 150 calories, 11 grams of protein

Oatmeal with a Protein Boost – Cook 1 packet of low-sugar instant oatmeal in water; stir in 1 tbsp (6 g) plain protein powder. About 150 calories, 9 grams of protein.

Salmon and Crackers – Mix 2 ounces (60 g) canned salmon with 1 tbsp of Dijon mustard. Spread on a 4 medium-sized whole grain crackers. About 145 calories, 13 grams of protein.

Susan Bowerman is Director of Nutrition Training at Herbalife. Susan is a Registered Dietitian and a Board-Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics.

 

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